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Dr. Susan Rogers

recently retired internist at Stroger Hospital

"Why We Need Single Payer Health Care!"


Dr. Rogers analyzes the problems in the health care system that remain despite the ACA, and advocates for national health insurance, sometimes referred to as Medicare for All or a single-payer healthcare system.

 

 

About Susan Rogers:

Dr. Susan Rogers, recently retired, is a volunteer attending hospitalist and internist at the John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County. She previously was co-director of medical student programs for the Department of Medicine. She is an assistant professor of medicine at Rush University.

Dr. Rogers received her medical degree from the University of Illinois College of Medicine and completed her residency at Cook County Hospital, where she served as chief resident. She is a national board member of Physicians for a National Health Program and a past co-president of Health Care for All Illinois.

 

Our Adult Programs:
A typical Sunday meeting begins at 10:30, ends at noon and consists of a speaker or presentation focusing on current issues, ethical philosophy, lifespan education, or the arts. Platforms are open to the public and admission is free, although we request a donation of $5.
 
Our Program for Children:
The Golden Rule Sunday School, for children from birth through 8th grade, also meets every Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to noon, September through May. For more info, contact the Sunday School director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Location: 7574 Lincoln Ave. Skokie IL (at Howard St.)
Park in our lot, on Howard or Jerome St, or in the nearby Albany Bank lot.

 


 

Garry Cooper

CEO/Co-founder of Rheaply, Inc. a Chicago-based tech startup

"What Does a Scientist Look Like?!: Diversity in Science"


Dr. Cooper will tell us about his company, Rheaply, his personal experiences as a scientist, and the importance of well-funded, well-managed science in Chicago. As an African American who is also a neuroscientist and entrepreneur, Cooper is familiar with the challenges and discomfort of being one of the few, or only, blacks in science. Now, he considers it a passion of his to make himself visible and available to other aspiring scientists of color.

 

About Garry Cooper:

Dr. Garry Cooper is the CEO/Co-founder of Rheaply, Inc. a Chicago-based tech startup with a simple mission: make research better, make the world better. Rheaply has developed and launched a novel marketplace for research scientists to buy/sell, trade, donate, share pricy scientific resources as well as more easily collaborate with their colleagues. Dr. Cooper is also a visiting scholar at Northwestern University Department of Physiology. Before Rheaply, Garry was a Senior Consultant at Ernst & Young, LLP in the Life Science Advisory practice where he works in performance improvement for biopharmaceutical clients, and. Before joining Ernst & Young, Dr. Cooper was a post-doctoral fellow at Northwestern University in the department of physiology at Feinberg School of Medicine, where he worked with Profs. Richard Silverman (inventor of Lyrica®), Eric Weiss, and D. James Surmeier in furthering efforts to develop and identify a therapeutic measure to slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease. Before his post-doctoral training, Dr. Cooper was a consultant at Promidian Consulting, a NY-based pharmaceutical consulting firm. In Promidian’s Chicago office, Dr. Cooper worked on projects concerning late-stage clinical trial/pre-market launch strategy. Before joining Promidian, Dr. Cooper worked on drug development for Parkinson’s disease at Northwestern University. The majority of this work was done while completing his PhD in neuroscience at Northwestern University under the supervision of Richard B. Silverman and D. James Surmeier. While at Northwestern University, Dr. Cooper received several awards for scientific merit and presentation, published in high-impacting peer-reviewed international journals (i.e.,Nature Communication), and participated in a drug development effort that led to a US patent. Before coming to Northwestern, Dr. Cooper worked in the department of chemistry at Indiana University. While there, he led a team of several undergraduate students in managing the organic chemistry teaching laboratories and outreach efforts to middle/high school students aiming to deepen their passion for science. Prior to joining the chemistry department, Dr. Cooper was a student at Indiana University completing a Bachelors of Science in Mathematics and a Bachelors of Arts in Chemistry.

Dr. Cooper is a member of Sigma Xi, The Honor Society for Research, AAAS, SFN as well as a former board member of the Midwest Chapter of the American Parkinson’s Disease Association.

 

Our Adult Programs:
A typical Sunday meeting begins at 10:30, ends at noon and consists of a speaker or presentation focusing on current issues, ethical philosophy, lifespan education, or the arts. Platforms are open to the public and admission is free, although we request a donation of $5.
 
Our Program for Children:
The Golden Rule Sunday School, for children from birth through 8th grade, also meets every Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to noon, September through May. For more info, contact the Sunday School director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Location: 7574 Lincoln Ave. Skokie IL (at Howard St.)
Park in our lot, on Howard or Jerome St, or in the nearby Albany Bank lot.

 


Jamie LaRue

Director of the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom

"Alt-Facts, Alt-Right, Alt-Reality"


With the rise of so-called "fake news," it is more important than ever to think critically about what we hear and read. As American astronomer Cliff Stoll said, "data is not information, information is not knowledge, knowledge is not understanding, and understanding is not wisdom." That is, just because you have some “facts” and share them doesn’t mean you’re informed or the “facts” are useful.

Librarians, who have long been activists, are mobilizing like never before ensure the free flow of information, protesting the Administration’s executive orders and working within their communities helping us all to grow as we participate ethically in discovering and using information. 

 

 

About Jamie LaRue:

James (Jamie) LaRue is Director of the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom. Author of "The New Inquisition: Understanding and Managing Intellectual Freedom Challenges" (Libraries Unlimited, 2007). He is a former public library administrator, academic librarian, newspaper columnist and TV author interview host. An experienced speaker, he has provided hundreds of keynotes, workshops, and webinars for trustees, communities, and librarians on such topics as effective library advocacy, digital publishing challenges, patron privacy, policy formation, and civic engagement.

 

 Our Adult Programs:

A typical Sunday meeting begins at 10:30, ends at noon and consists of a speaker or presentation focusing on current issues, ethical philosophy, lifespan education, or the arts. Platforms are open to the public and admission is free, although we request a donation of $5.
 
Our Program for Children:
The Golden Rule Sunday School, for children from birth through 8th grade, also meets every Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to noon. For more info, contact the Sunday School director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Location: 7574 Lincoln Ave. Skokie IL (at Howard St.)
Park in our lot, on Howard or Jerome St, or in the nearby Albany Bank lot.

 


 

Sharon Welch

 

"The Soul of Democracy "


Professor Sharon Welch, of the Unitarian Universalist Theological School in Chicago (Meadville Lombard), will describe what she sees as the struggle for the very soul of democracy: interdependence, reason, compassion, respect for all human beings, and stewardship of the natural world that sustains us. While the threats to democracy are real and growing, people throughout the world are also combating authoritarianism and working together to revitalize an inclusive and expansive democracy. Professor Welch will provide perspective on how to understand these rising threats and the vital ways that they can be countered.

 

About Sharon D. Welch:

Affiliate Faculty, Professor of Religion and Society

M.A. and Ph.D., Theology, Vanderbilt University

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr. Welch is a Senior Fellow of the Institute for Humanist Studies, a Board member of the Cook County League of Women Voters, and a member of the Unitarian Universalist Peace Ministry Network.

She has held positions as  Provost  and Professor at Meadville Lombard Theological school from 2007-2017, Professor and Chair of Religious Studies, Professor of Women's and Gender Studies and Adjunct Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis at the University of Missouri from 1991-2007. She was assistant and then associate professor of Theology and Religion and Society at Harvard Divinity School from 1982 to 1991. While at the University of Missouri, Welch was a Senior Fellow in the Center for Religion, the Professions, and the Public, a project leader of the Ford-sponsored Difficult Dialogues Program, and co-chair of the MU Committee for the Scholarship of Multicultural Teaching and Learning.

Welch is the author of five books: Real Peace, Real Security: The challenges of global citizenship, After Empire: The Art and Ethos of Enduring Peace, A Feminist Ethic of Risk, Sweet Dreams in America: Making Ethics and Spirituality Work, and Communities of Resistance and Solidarity. Welch is also a regular contributor to Tikkun magazine, and is the author of many articles. Her most recent book, After the Protests Are Heard: An Ethic of Power, Professionalism and Risk, is being published by New York University Press.

Dr. Welch is the recipient of numerous awards, many of which recognize her excellence in teaching.  Among these are the Internationalizing the Curriculum Course Development Award (2002) and the College of Education, High Flyer Teaching Award (several years).  She also received the Annual Gustavus Myers Award: Honorable Mention for her 1999 book, Sweet Dreams in America: Making Ethics and Spirituality Work (Routledge). She was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Sacred Theology by Starr King School of the Ministry in May 2007.

 

 

Our Adult Programs:
A typical Sunday meeting begins at 10:30, ends at noon and consists of a speaker or presentation focusing on current issues, ethical philosophy, lifespan education, or the arts. Platforms are open to the public and admission is free, although we request a donation of $5.
 
Our Program for Children:
The Golden Rule Sunday School, for children from birth through 8th grade, also meets every Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to noon, September through May. For more info, contact the Sunday School director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Location: 7574 Lincoln Ave. Skokie IL (at Howard St.)
Park in our lot, on Howard or Jerome St, or in the nearby Albany Bank lot.

 


 

Canice Prendergast

 Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago

"Contemporary Art and its Market"


Canice Prendergast is the W. Allen Wallis Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago and also head of the critically acclaimed and award winning contemporary art collection at the University’s Business School. Prendergast will describe the collection’s role and evolution, and the strangeness of navigating the art market.

 

About Canice Prendergast:

Canice is W. Allen Wallis Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago. He works on many areas of economics including labor markets and organizations. He has won various teaching prizes from our students. He got his Phd from Yale and his bachelor’s degree from Trinity College in Dublin. But today he is here to talk about his second passion which is art. Canice is the chair of the art committee at the University of Chicago. Under his leadership they have built an award winning collection of art – the 3rd largest in the city of Chicago and he will tell you that story.

 

Our Adult Programs:
A typical Sunday meeting begins at 10:30, ends at noon and consists of a speaker or presentation focusing on current issues, ethical philosophy, lifespan education, or the arts. Platforms are open to the public and admission is free, although we request a donation of $5.
 
Our Program for Children:
The Golden Rule Sunday School, for children from birth through 8th grade, also meets every Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to noon, September through May. For more info, contact the Sunday School director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Location: 7574 Lincoln Ave. Skokie IL (at Howard St.)
Park in our lot, on Howard or Jerome St, or in the nearby Albany Bank lot.

 

  

  

  

 

  

  

Oct 14
8:00 pm 

Kristin Lems

The Second Saturday Coffeehouse delights in welcoming back folksinger/songwriter Kristin Lems to open our twelfth year of music and spoken word. 

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