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Susan Trieschmann

 

"Curt’s Café - Serving The Underserved"


Susan will discuss her work with Curt’s Café and the path that led her to create this Evanston-based not-for-profit organization. At Curt’s, young adults are young adults are taught marketable skills and then assisted in securing employment. They teach culinary techniques but also provide instruction their students will need to fill in educational gaps, gain confidence, and become job-ready.

 

 

About Susan Trieschmann:

Susan has worked in Food Service since the age of 13. She was the Director of Catering at the legendary Pump Room before becoming an original owner and 25 year partner of Food For Thought Enterprise, www.fftchicago.com. She helped to build the company from a small catering company to a food service industry specializing in upscale catering and café food service management. Susan is also an original member of Restorative Justice Evanston (RJE), www.restorativejusticeevanston.com. RJE is a non-profit organization in Evanston that works with youth and community on peaceful dialogue around harm caused, celebrations and conflicts. Susan is an Evanston resident, has been married to Tom Trieschmann for 26 years and has two children, Trevor and Anna, who are both graduates of ETHS. She is passionate about giving youth a second chance and helping them create a positive future for themselves and their families.

 

Our Adult Programs:
A typical Sunday meeting begins at 10:30, ends at noon and consists of a speaker or presentation focusing on current issues, ethical philosophy, lifespan education, or the arts. Platforms are open to the public and admission is free, although we request a donation of $5.
 
Our Program for Children:
The Golden Rule Sunday School, for children from birth through 8th grade, also meets every Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to noon, September through May. For more info, contact the Sunday School director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Location: 7574 Lincoln Ave. Skokie IL (at Howard St.)
Park in our lot, on Howard or Jerome St, or in the nearby Albany Bank lot.

 


 

 

Gail Lukasik

 

"I Kept My Mother’s Racial Secret for 17 Years: White Like Her"


Gail Lukasik is a mystery author, a former ballerina, and a UIC writing instructor. While researching her family roots, she discovered her mother was “passing" as white. Complying with her mother’s wishes, Gail kept that secret for 17 years. She recently told her family story of race and racial passing in her newly published book, White Like Her: My Family’s Story Of Race and Racial Passing. In the historical context of the Jim Crow South, Gail explores her mother’s decision to pass, how she hid her secret even from her own husband, and the price she paid for choosing whiteness. 

Copies of Gail's book, White Like Her: My Family’s Story Of Race And Racial Passing, will be on sale during the coffee hour.

 

 

About Gail Lukasik:

Gail was born in Cleveland, Ohio and grew up in the suburb of Parma. Her mother, an avid moviegoer, took her every Friday night to the local movie theater. That’s where she fell in love with stories of all kinds. Her dream was to be a movie star, a ballerina or a writer.

As luck would have it, she realized two of her three dreams. She was a member of the Cleveland Civic Ballet Company. And she’s the author of four mystery novels, a memoir, a book of poetry, and numerous poems, essays, and short stories. Though never a movie star, Gail was active in Chicago area community theater groups dancing, singing, and acting in productions such as Cabaret, Desert Song, South Pacific and California Suite.

Early in her professional career, she worked a variety of jobs as diverse as a supervisor at Southwestern Bell Telephone, a freelance writer for McDonald’s Corporation, and a painting touchup artist. But her passion for writing never left her.

Eager to find a community of like-mined writers and wanting to immerse herself in literature and writing, she quit her job as Director of Public Relations at Robert Morris College and enrolled in graduate school in creative writing/poetry at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC).

After earning a M.A. and a Ph.D. in English with a specialization in writing poetry, she taught writing and literature classes at UIC, while simultaneously managing the Internship Program and the Nonfiction Writing Program. It was during this time that Gail became hooked on female detective novels.

One day her son said to her, “Mom, you’re always reading mysteries, why don’t you try writing one. Her first attempt became Destroying Angels. Kirkus Reviews called Destroying Angels, “a riveting debut thriller.”

Before writing the second book in the Leigh Girard series and always ready for a new adventure, she became a certified canoe instructor. Her experiences leading canoe trips inspired Death’s Door, which Kirkus described as “fast-paced and literate with a strong protagonist and a puzzle that keeps you guessing.” The third book, Peak Season for Murder, was awarded a Lovey Award for Best Traditional Amateur Sleuth at the Love is Murder conference in Chicago.

White Like Her was inspired by her two appearances on PBS’ Genealogy Roadshow and the discovery of her “lost” New Orleans family.

Still an avid moviegoer, Gail lives in Libertyville, Illinois with her husband.

 

Our Adult Programs:
A typical Sunday meeting begins at 10:30, ends at noon and consists of a speaker or presentation focusing on current issues, ethical philosophy, lifespan education, or the arts. Platforms are open to the public and admission is free, although we request a donation of $5.
 
Our Program for Children:
The Golden Rule Sunday School, for children from birth through 8th grade, also meets every Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to noon, September through May. For more info, contact the Sunday School director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Location: 7574 Lincoln Ave. Skokie IL (at Howard St.)
Park in our lot, on Howard or Jerome St, or in the nearby Albany Bank lot.

 


 

 

David Ansell, MD, MPH

Senior Vice President for Community Health Equity, Rush University Medical Center,  and Associate Provost for Community Affairs, Rush University 

"The Death Gap: How Inequality Kills"


Those living in America's poorest and sickest neighborhoods have a life expectancy 35 years lower than those living in its healthiest and wealthiest areas. Drawing on his nearly four decades as a physician, Dr. David Ansell will discuss the devastating impacts of socio-economic inequality on health and how we can begin to close this death gap.

Copies of Dr. Ansell's book, The Death Gap: How Inequality Kills will be on sale during the coffee hour.

 

About David Ansell:

As Rush’s first leader of community health equity, a role he assumed in October of 2016, Ansell is leading Rush’s strategy to be a catalyst for community health and economic vitality on Chicago’s West Side. He previously was Rush’s senior vice president, system integration. Ansell joined Rush in 2005 as the Medical Center’s first chief medical officer (CMO) — a position he held until 2014 — as well as the associate dean and senior vice president for clinical affairs and the Michael E. Kelly MD Presidential Professor at Rush Medical College.

In 2002, during his ten-year tenure as chairperson of the Department of Internal Medicine at Chicago’s Mount Sinai Hospital, Ansell cofounded the Sinai Urban Health Institute, which conducts health inequity research, develops innovative community health interventions, delivers community health worker training and consultation, and provides a broad scope of evaluation services.

After joining Rush, Ansell helped establish, in 2007, the not-for-profit Metropolitan Chicago Breast Cancer Taskforce, which focuses on ameliorating the higher breast cancer mortality rate among black women. He currently is the chair of board of the taskforce.

Beginning in 1978, Ansell spent 17 years at Chicago’s Cook County Hospital, where he implemented a breast cancer screening program, one of the first in the United States. From 1993 to 1995, he served as the hospital’s division chief of general medicine/primary care.

Ansell recounted his experiences at Cook County Hospital in his critically acclaimed 2011 memoir, County: Life, Death and Politics at Chicago’s Public Hospital. The University of Chicago Press published his second book, The Death Gap: How Inequality Kills, in 2017.

As a coauthor of a study in The New England Journal of Medicine, and through his testimony before the U.S. Congress, Ansell influenced the passage in 1986 of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, a federal law that regulates the transfer of patients from one hospital to another. He also is the author of numerous other papers and book chapters on health disparities.

Ansell earned a BA from Franklin and Marshall College in 1974 and, in 1978, his MD from SUNY Upstate Medical University. In 1991, he received a Masters of Public Health degree from the University of Illinois School of Public Health.

 

Our Adult Programs:
A typical Sunday meeting begins at 10:30, ends at noon and consists of a speaker or presentation focusing on current issues, ethical philosophy, lifespan education, or the arts. Platforms are open to the public and admission is free, although we request a donation of $5.
 
Our Program for Children:
The Golden Rule Sunday School, for children from birth through 8th grade, also meets every Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to noon, September through May. For more info, contact the Sunday School director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Location: 7574 Lincoln Ave. Skokie IL (at Howard St.)
Park in our lot, on Howard or Jerome St, or in the nearby Albany Bank lot.

 


 

 

Miriam Petty

Assistant Professor, Department of Radio, Television, & Film at Northwestern University  

"Stealing the Show: African Americans in 1930s Hollywood"


Dr. Miriam Petty will discuss her first book, Stealing the Show: African American Performers and Audiences in 1930s Hollywood, exploring the complex relationships between black audiences and black performers in the classical Hollywood era. Dr. Petty focuses on five performers whose careers flourished during this period—Louise Beavers, Fredi Washington, Lincoln “Stepin Fetchit” Perry, Bill “Bojangles” Robinson and Hattie McDaniel—and will show us how these actors, despite being routinely cast in stereotypical roles, managed to negotiate their complex positions in Hollywood and to ultimately “steal the show.” In addition to showing film clips, Dr. Petty will discuss how their work is still relevant today.

Copies of Dr. Petty’s book, Stealing the Show: African American Performers and Audiences in 1930s Hollywood, will be on sale during the coffee hour.

 

 

About Miriam Petty:

Miriam J. Petty earned her PhD from Emory University’s Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts and previously taught at Rutgers University in Newark, N.J., and Princeton University in Princeton, N.J. Petty writes and teaches about race, stardom, performance, reception, adaptation, and genre and is especially interested in the history of African American representation in Hollywood film. Her first book, Stealing the Show: African American Performers and Audiences in 1930s Hollywood (University of California Press) explores the complex relationships between black audiences and black performers in the classical Hollywood era.

Stealing the Show has been awarded the Society for Cinema and Media Studies Best First Book Award for 2016-2017. Petty’s other honors include a 2015-2016 Alice Kaplan Institute Faculty Fellowship and a 2014-2015 Junior Faculty Fellowship with the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. An academic with a longstanding commitment to public scholarship, Petty is also an avid producer of public programs: her recent projects include the 2012 symposium "Madea’s Big Scholarly Roundtable: Perspectives on the Media of Tyler Perry" at Northwestern University; the 2014 retrospective “Mama and Papa Lala: 30 Years of Billops-Hatch Films” at Emory University; and the 2015-2016 film series "Seeds of Disunion: Classics of African American Stereotypy" at the Black Cinema House of Chicago. She is currently at work on a book manuscript examining media mogul Tyler Perry’s productions and his African American audiences’ nostalgic investments in such cultural forms as folktales, music, literature, and religious practice.

 

Our Adult Programs:
A typical Sunday meeting begins at 10:30, ends at noon and consists of a speaker or presentation focusing on current issues, ethical philosophy, lifespan education, or the arts. Platforms are open to the public and admission is free, although we request a donation of $5.
 
Our Program for Children:
The Golden Rule Sunday School, for children from birth through 8th grade, also meets every Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to noon, September through May. For more info, contact the Sunday School director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Location: 7574 Lincoln Ave. Skokie IL (at Howard St.)
Park in our lot, on Howard or Jerome St, or in the nearby Albany Bank lot.

 


 

 

Kelly Cassidy

 

"The Politics of Dealing With Gun Violence"


In reaction to continuing gun violence, Rep. Cassidy will discuss the necessity of smart gun legislation in America today and the challenges behind actually getting there.

 

 

About Kelly Cassidy:

As an organizer, a legislative director and a mom, Kelly Cassidy has spent the past 20 years living her values. Whether fighting for the rights of women and the LGBT community as an activist, working for a smarter criminal justice system within the state’s attorney’s office, or ensuring that her three boys have safe spaces to play in our community, she has devoted the last two decades to making government more accessible, efficient and effective.

Those experiences, both inside and outside the system, have afforded her great insight into how to be a better, more responsive and effective State Representative for the 14th district.

Prior to her appointment as State Representative, Cassidy was responsible for development and management of the $20 million grant funding programs within the State’s Attorney’s office. She was a key player in creating programs for domestic violence victims, hate crimes victims and victims of human trafficking, as well as programs to address mortgage fraud, support community justice centers and enhance the use of DNA evidence.

Additionally, she helped lead the budget process for the State’s Attorney, which has given her great insight into the impact of budgets on government policy. While budget numbers shrunk, Cassidy found creative approaches to fund critical programs.

 

Our Adult Programs:
A typical Sunday meeting begins at 10:30, ends at noon and consists of a speaker or presentation focusing on current issues, ethical philosophy, lifespan education, or the arts. Platforms are open to the public and admission is free, although we request a donation of $5.
 
Our Program for Children:
The Golden Rule Sunday School, for children from birth through 8th grade, also meets every Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to noon, September through May. For more info, contact the Sunday School director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Location: 7574 Lincoln Ave. Skokie IL (at Howard St.)
Park in our lot, on Howard or Jerome St, or in the nearby Albany Bank lot.

 

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